ASIST2012: Metrics 2012

Oct 31 2012 Published by under bibliometrics, Conferences

I attended two days of the ASIST annual meeting. I'm actually quite bummed because I was sure I wasn't going to get to any conferences for a long time because of the twins, but this one was local so I thought I could go. Unfortunately, the superstorm Sandy shut down daycare and also caused Baltimore to shut the streets down 🙁   I did make it in for a workshop on Friday and most of the day on Sunday. Lesson learned - ASIST is more than happy to arrange a room for any mothers who need to pump, but you do need to ask in advance.

Metrics 2012: Symposium on Informetric and Scientometric Research

This is the second time this was held. It's a nice small group that discusses works in progress and recently completed work.

Kate McCain presented on "Assessing obliteration by incorporation" - I've been trying to remember the name for this phenomenon. This is when some concept becomes so ingrained in the field the original article is no longer cited - there's no citation for when the concept is mentioned. A similar idea is "palimpsestic syndrome" - that's when a newer article or review article is cited for a concept instead of the original source because that's where the person read about it and they're unaware of the originator of the idea. The way to find bibliometric evidence is to look for noun phrases with references. In the past this has been done 3 ways:

  • using only the metadata and citations from WoS (record level searching)
  • using the metadata and citations but then pulling the f/t and reviewing that (record level searching and text analysis)
  • now using the f/t

The problem with the first two ways is that you miss a lot of things that use the concept but not in the metadata, only somewhere down in the full text.  She looked for "bounded rationality" using JSTOR's collection - Drexel's subscription. This is somewhat limiting because they only have some JSTOR collections and the coverage of psychology is not good.

Dietmar Wolfram talked about journal similarity by incoming citing journal topicality. He did this for LIS because it annoys us all that the MIS and health informatics journals top the category in JCR - when they really maybe should be in another category. This seemed to work except for small journals or orphan journals (ones that are not cited).

Other things of interest:

  • lots of use of gephi
  • lots of student interest
  • open position at Drexel if anyone is interested

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