Kindle Unlimited. Distruction? No.

Jul 20 2014 Published by under libraries

Amazon announced a service where for a monthly fee (currently $9.99) you can read unlimited ebooks a month (from a stock of 600k). John Dupuis has been linking to various stories about it on Twitter. One from Vox suggests the new service might lead to library's destruction what with funding issues what they were a few years ago.

Many others have pointed out the issues with that. The first being that most libraries offer a service free (because of your tax dollars) that lets you check out unlimited books a month for just about any device. Mine limits me to 6 books at a time from one of the 3 or so services they offer and a certain number of "units" or "credits" from another of the services.

If you have the $10/month, though, this would mean no waiting where you often have to wait for popular titles at the public library because of idiotic requirements from the publishers that make these services treat ebooks like print books - one user/copy at a time.

Today, John pointed to this piece by Kelly Jensen on Book Riot. Jensen is all offended at people saying libraries are the NetFlix for books because libraries do so much more. Well, yes, but I just can't get offended. I've found and a local survey has shown that people often don't know what ebooks are, how they can get them, and what is available at their library. They do know about Amazon, but they don't know about Overdrive. Amazon is easy, Overdrive can be hard (once you get going it's very simple, though). I actually think it's helpful and useful and not too reductionist and problematic to refer to libraries as the NetFlix for books. Emphasizing and publicizing this one small service won't cause people with small children to forget about story time, college students and professors to forget about doing research, avid readers to forget about print books. It may, however, bring in new users or bring back users/patrons who have been too busy to come in person or who are now home bound for some reason.

What I do wonder about is licensing. There has been lots of discussion about the big 6 and how they really, really don't want libraries to lend ebooks. Some have done stupid things like say libraries have to rebuy the book after it has been checked out 26 times or so. Others have delays or flat-out won't license ebooks to libraries. (not talking research libraries and STEM books - we can get them if we want to spend the $ and they aren't textbooks). One big publisher gave in recently - but sort of slowly.

Amazon's in a big fight with one publisher with all sorts of shenanigans like slowing down shipping for their books. The authors are all up in arms. It's a mess. With that uneasy relationship, I really am curious about publishers participating in this program. Do they see it differently than the library products? Is it just the same ones that do license for library use? 600k books - but which 600k? Presumably the entire Project Gutenberg library is on there (see "catching up on classics") .... and some other books are featured on the home page. I don't have time to do the analysis, but I'm curious.

$10/month could add up... particularly if the catalog isn't that large. I think it sounds like a good service, but the devil is in the details. What does the catalog look like? Are people out of money to spend on entertainment with all the video downloading services and internet and data and what not? Seems like an obvious move for Amazon (they aren't the first - Oyster and Scribd have similar services). We'll see, I guess.

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