Who are my researchers citing? A quick and dirty way to find out

Apr 21 2017 Published by under bibliometrics, Collection Development

This probably shouldn't warrant a post, but a few very experienced and up-to-date librarians didn't immediately know so probably worth sharing. Also, it turns out that Scopus* has hidden or removed a lot of the useful stuff and made it confusing to even know where to enter the search.**

In Scopus, search for your researchers. In my case, an affiliation search works.***

 

The affiliation search is a tab from the home page. There's no way to know it's a tab. It's just an underlined word. You actually then click around on the page until you find some place to type your query.

From the results list - and mind you I do this exact search regularly so yours might not be so precise - go ahead and click on all the documents. If you're at NIH then crap, because you have more then 10,000 journal articles per year so you have to do some major slicing and dicing. I just limited to 2016 and journal articles just because.

Then you look  for the "..." but then you realize it's grayed out and you can't actually click on it.

So then you click to highlight all, and then you click on "..." and you see view references.

From here, you can list the top sources and, theoretically, analyze them. They're not completely clean though. My set had JGR as well as the spelled out and the specific ones. Likewise with ApJ. So how quick and how dirty is ok? For collections development, you're probably cool with reading off. Otherwise you could export and then use OpenRefine or similar to clean.

* Not affiliated, not endorsing!

** plus - this thing in advanced search in which it is forever putting in codes I do not want ... anyway...

***hey, all the branding for my larger institution is gone? aw come on.

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